Webcasts
2021-12-15
59:37 min
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Content presented by Jean-Yin Tan, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM (LAIM), Cert. Prof. Mgt.
The most common cause of poor performance in exercising horses is exertional rhabdomyolysis. While part I presented the diagnostic approach to muscle disorders, acute and recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis, this session will build on those concepts by discussing another form of chronic exertional rhabdomyolysis called PSSM and other common or emerging muscular disorders in Canada.
2021-11-25
54:31 min
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Content presented by Jean-Yin Tan, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM (LAIM), Cert. Prof. Mgt.
The most common cause of poor performance in exercising horses is exertional rhabdomyolysis. In this session, you will learn to differentiate between causes of equine myopathies. You will familiarize yourself with the diagnostic approach and formulate appropriate treatment regimens for common exertional myopathies.
2021-11-30
01:05:20 min
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Content presented by Daniel Pang, BVSc, MSc, PhD, Dipl. ACVAA, Dipl. ECVAA
During this webcast, Dr. Daniel Pang will provide updated information regarding equine anesthesia and sedation procedures, including: drug protocol options and pharmacology: selection of drugs for sedation and anesthetic premedication, options for induction and short-term maintenance of general anesthesia;cardiorespiratory physiology: impact of sedation and anesthesia on the cardiorespiratory systems; and,anesthetic monitoring: assessing depth of anesthesia and monitoring equipment.
Scientific Snapshots
2021-12-15
03:30 min
Content prepared by Jennifer Jobin, BSc, DVM
Atropine dosing for uveitis in horses: Study shows no deleterious effects when 1 drop is used topically every 6 hours in an experimental setting Uveitis is a common condition affecting horses. This inflammatory condition causes miosis and painful ciliary muscle spasms. Atropine is a nonselective muscarinic receptor-antagonist and a cornerstone of treatment of uveitis because it causes mydriasis, cycloplegia (inhibits the movement of ciliary muscles) and decreases the risk of synechia...
2021-11-20
03:30 min
Content prepared by Jennifer Jobin, BSc, DVM
Study evaluates the effect of additional prescriptive low-intensity exercise as part of a practical weight-loss program for equids Metabolic syndrome is characterized by the combination of obesity and insulin dysregulation, and can lead to laminitis. Treatment of metabolic syndrome generally focuses on weight loss via dietary restriction. Optimizing the health of horses affected by metabolic syndrome by improving insulin sensitivity would potentially decrease the risk of laminitis. Studies...
2021-10-17
04:30 min
Content prepared by Jennifer Jobin, BSc, DVM
Distal sesamoidean ligament injuries can be consistently diagnosed by ultrasound, carrying a guarded prognosis for return to full use, study shows. Most equine veterinarians are familiar with soft tissue injuries in the metacarpal and metatarsal regions, however soft tissue injuries in the pastern region are less common. The distal sesamoidean ligaments are a continuation of the suspensory ligament at the level of the pastern; there are seven of these in total. These include one unpaired...
Brain Matters
2021-12-15
01:00 min
Content prepared by Katie Ellis, DVM, CEVMM, CVA
Therapeutic ultrasound has been shown to have both nonthermal and thermal effects, depending on the machine settings.
2021-11-20
01:00 min
Content prepared by Jean-Yin Tan, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM (LAIM), Cert. Prof. Mgt.
You are examining a 19-year-old Draft cross gelding for lameness. You notice he has a body condition score of 5/9, a cresty neck and fat pads above the tailhead. Radiographs reveal 5 degrees rotation in the left front P3. He has a thick, long hair coat. His physical examination is otherwise within normal limits.
2021-10-17
01:00 min
Content prepared by Katie Ellis, DVM, CEVMM, CVA
You evaluate a horse for swelling on the left forelimb. Using ultrasonography, this swelling is confirmed to be tenosynovitis within the common digital extensor tendon sheath. There are multiple sheaths that surround the extensor tendons at the level of the carpus. Tenosynovitis within the extensor tendon sheaths can occur secondary to trauma or a penetrating wound.